Magens Bay --San Thomas

Tuesday, October 16, 2012

Action Please…


Today Blog Host brought to you by Sylvie Branch of Sylvie Branch.com. And She asks ‘What does the word—sorry—mean to us?”
Interesting question! Sorry is such a sacred word to me. The word is so sacred that I only utter it when I am deeply moved.

“I am sorry mom,” the girl cried out
“Do you really know what the word, ‘sorry’ mean?” Asked the mother
“I don’t know…”the girl replied
“ Why did you say it when you don’t even know what that mean?” The mother asked in return
“I just don’t want to get into trouble.” The girl answered.


Just because we want to avoid the problem doesn’t mean we are sorry. That was the message that I have been trying to tell my girls. I don’t want them to say that they are sorry unless they know exactly why and have a plan of action not to repeat it again. Sure, it will take a lot of patience and time to mold this philosophy into their minds, but I feel it is all worthy.
On the other hand, stubborn children don’t mutter the word “Sorry,” unless they deeply feel it. That is okay, as long as, they understand that when they make mistakes, they need to reflect on.

“Sorry” doesn’t really mean much to me –‘cause I look beyond words, I look for actions. If your actions show, I can hear your heart muttering the word.  In fact, in many cases, I feel like we overuse the word and it has lost its true meaning.

Until next stop,
Journey of Life

18 comments:

  1. I am one that will say I'm sorry when I really mean it. But I never say something I don't mean--even when it might be the polite thing to do in a situation. If I'm not feeling sorry--I won't say it just to make peace.

    I'm with you on this post!!

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    1. Same here and I do say sorry when I feel for other misfortunes when I can seem to find other words to replace.

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  2. So true. Actions speak louder than words always!!

    Kathy
    http://gigglingtruckerswife.blogspot.com

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  3. I agree with kathy... actions speak louder than words

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  4. I'm sorry followed by either an explanation of why the deed was done or a but... means the speaker may not be sorry for the deed but rather sorry for your reaction. Meaning, they may be sorry you were hurt or angry at their action, but not sorry they did whatever they did. I think this is common and I have certainly handed out a few of those apologies in my life. Intention is the most important thing. Was I hurt because they intentionally hurt me? Or was I hurt by accident or by my own over reaction? Big difference and we need to know which I'm sorry we're receiving.

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  5. I was raised by parents who drilled the "please",thank you", "I'm sorry" into all of us 6 kids. My hubby used to tease me that my middle initial "S" was for sorry, for I would apologize often. I agree you should mean you are actually sorry, and not use the word lightly. I am finding though, that the courtesy it affords is nice. I am finding people here in the city a bit aggressive and lately, a "I'm sorry" would be appreciated. Had a woman drop and entire LARGE ice coffee on me while sitting on the train the other day. Soaked me, my bag etc.. I expected an " I'm sorry, can I help you dry off, hand me a tissue etc.." I got " ha ha, I cooled you off" and she got up and went to another seat! Wow.. I was actually speechless. Obviously, we wasn't sorry, but it would have helped the situation.

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    1. :-) Your husband is cute :-)

      And that lady is rude. Even she said sorry and moved to another seat right away. I would not have accepted, unless she got up and do something about it, for instance, offering to go to the next stop so she can help you clean up or passing on tissues to you or something. Even the look and facial expression gesturing genuine apologetic would do. At the very least 'not to get up and moved to another seat.

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  6. Sorry is a word that should not be thrown around like it is nothing. Sorry carries a lot of punch, a lot of heart. By the way, I know parents that don't feel they need to apologize to their children. But I am a firm believer that if I am wrong, or I've wronged my children in any way, I always say I am sorry to them. I have honored this since they were little children.

    I liked this post, Angela. :)

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    1. Yes. As a parent, a human, we can make mistake too therefore an apology is definitely expected.

      Thank you Virginia!

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  7. Wow I agree with you. I'm Sorry is so commonly used and most times not meant. That is what I wrote about on my own blog with this prompt. I do not say it unless I mean whole heartedly.

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    1. Indeed ...And yours are very touchy and personal.

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  8. That's an interesting question. I never did like that saying "Love means never having to say you're sorry" because there are a few times when I've really needed to hear that from my husband! Thanks for stopping over. You are a no-reply so I can't respond to your comment :(

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